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October 20, 2017

FIT Fashion Application Class: Highlights

Part 1:  Mass vs Line:  We do very fast warm-up poses just to establish mass, as opposed to Line.  I discovered that I really like using Nu-Pastels to delineate mass in 2 minute gesture sketches on the 18 X 24" paper.  I bought skin colors since last week and here are my most recent warm up sketches.

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Part 2: 

Drawing  and Opposition: Drawing from head to toe, alternating between sides as you move down the body.  How does one side of the shape compare to the other?

I wasn't familiar with the term "opposition," but our Professor had us quickly draw three pieces of toast - showing how we could change one side from the other, or even leave one of the sides as an incomplete line.

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We sketched many poses from our two models for the rest of the class - always sketching back and forth from the head to the feet, and creating sealed up shapes like a children's coloring book.  I selected these two 18 X 24" sheets as an example.

 

Emma in Black Evening Gown:

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Emma in a tank top and drop crotch pants and Kevin with his Mohawk and Fancy Glasses:

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Part 3:  Drawing Negative Shapes  for parts of the figure or to carve out the entire figure by drawing parts or all of the background.  I was totally confused by this.  I do look at negative space to establish the positions of arms and legs, but that wasn't the goal for this exercise.  Our wonderful professor Janis Salek demonstrated how I could make the sweater vest on the model as a negative shape.  She sketched the dark graphite image, and then I tried to reinforce her teaching (right).

White sweater vest drawn as negative shape by filling in the black sweater:  

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White Shirt Drawn as Negative Shape, by drawing the background, and then I added pencil to the whole background. 

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October 12, 2017

Line vs Mass in Figure Drawing

Week 1:  We are working through a structured syllabus in my Fashion Application class at Fashion Institute of Technology, and after several weeks of working with "line,"  we worked with depiction of "mass."  Instead of using markers, I chose to work with Nu-Pastels, a completely new medium for me, and these two drawings were very fast poses using only small pieces of pastel chalk.  It would not be my favorite method for figure drawing, but it was a fun challenge to see if I could do it.  The first pose was 2 minutes and the second one was 7-10 minutes, if I remember correctly.  I bought a small set of the Nu Pastels for the class and don't have anything close to a skin color.

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Week 2:  These are 5 two minute poses to begin class, and I can still hear our professor saying, "mass only if you want to get all the way down to the feet on the 18" paper."  I still don't have a lighter pink Nu-Pastel, so this skin color was obviously done with the only pink-red in my set.

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September 29, 2017

Line vs Mass in FIT Class 4

I plan to continue my blog posts about my current class at FIT.  This week we focused on mass instead of line, and in the 3 minute warm up model drawings, we had to use color to emphasize some mass, using markers or Nu-Pastels.  Three minute poses were not long enough to complete each drawing, but this is a single 18 X 24" page, and my drawings proceeded from the right to the left  (I'm left-handed).  I tried to color the masses with my Tombow marker.

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I never used Nu-Pastels and later in the class she came by to demonstrate, asking permission to draw on my page.  She stressed using the chalk to block out the mass, and not drawing the edges and filling it in coloring book style. 

See her drawing demos  labeled "This" and "Not this."

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A 10 minute pose, and as before we were instructed to start our drawing at the top, and to proceed from one side of the face to the other, then the body, etc, in short segments, adding the other objects, the ceramic pumpkin and the chair, only when we drew our lines down to their level in the pose.  

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Our last pose was 12 minutes, and included both of the class models.  I can feel myself starting to use her prescribed drawing method, and working very fast to get everything included - two models, a table, chair, and platform!  Fashion illustrations have different body proportions than in real life - tall and skinny, and dramatic and bold.  In this class she said that we will develop our style by the end of the semester, and I'm beginning to see how our classes are leading in that direction. 

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September 22, 2017

Fashion Applications Class 2

Two drawings among many from my second class about Fashion Applications at FIT:

The goal of this class was to reemphasize line drawings, and to both draw models in an environment,  and draw two models together.  The professor still stressed starting the drawing at the very top - even if it a plant above the model's head - and then drawing from top to bottom, moving from side to side until reaching the bottom.  Lines should be confident and bold.

We had 7 minutes to draw the first model with the poppies, and 10 minutes for the two models together.  In each class she also shows us the work of famous fashion illustrators.  And gave us a link for a website to search and review specific fashion illustrators.

http://www.illustrationdivision.com/ 

 

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These are large drawings that needed to be photographed and not scanned. 

September 18, 2017

Fashion Applications at FIT

I'm taking another Illustration course this semester at Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT).  Last week was my first class and our professor demonstrated how she draws the models several times during the class.  She instructed us to start at the head and then slowly draw down the body carving out space - moving back and forth from one side to the other.  She stressed the body directions, and specifically the shoulder and hip directions and asked us to make them dramatic.  This was a 3 minute warm up drawing of mine early in the class, and when she came by me she sketched in those direction lines, and suggested that I bend her hips all the way over to the outside line she made for drama.

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2.  We had 3 models, each changing clothes multiple times.  This is a later 7 minute pose - as I tried to achieve more drama.

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3.  And this was my final pose at the very end of the 3 hour class.  This is definitely going to be fun!

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