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February 22, 2010

My Third Watercolor Journal with Dye Painted Book Cloth

I made my 3rd watercolor journal with another piece of fabric that I dye-painted - this time striped using corn dextrin resist with procion MX dyes.  This is  a 6 X 8" watercolor journal containing Fabriano Artistico 140 lb Soft Press paper - 6 signatures with 2 folios each.  The bookcloth was prepared by fusing my fabric to Thai mulberry paper using Wonder Under - see more about the method here.

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I used color-coordinated MiTientes paper as end papers. 

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There is still one more piece of fabric that I made in this first batch, and since I'm now using a big roll of Fabriano Artistico paper, I will make a 4th book to gain more experience handling the big pieces of paper instead of the usual 22 X 30 inch sheets.  There are 48 single pages in each book so will have enough watercolor journals on my shelf to last 5-6 months!

February 12, 2010

More Bookbinding Adventures

I just finished making my second watercolor journal using book cloth that I made from dye painted fabric (procion MX dyes and corn dextrin resist).  The first one can be seen here.  This 6 X 8"book is made using 140 lb Fabriano soft press watercolor paper and consists of 6 signatures with two folios in each.  I'm thrilled to complete another one.

The Book Cover - made with blue and purple dyes.

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The End Papers

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 Australian Reversed Piano Hinge Journal

I made a second watercolor journal this week - using Gwen Diehn's instructions for a sketchbook with removeable pages.  EDM Members can access these instructions in a file on the message board.  This looked like a fun technique to know - even though I like working in journals that can be numbered and stored on a shelf.

Exterior of 5 X 7.5" Book:  Made with Fabriano Artistico (8 folios in 4 signatures) and TexLibris bookcloth.

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Open Book - showing the spine:  The watercolor paper was used as end papers to insert the page block into the cover, so only one of the folios in each of those two signatures are removeable.

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The Concertina and Flat Hinge: 

There is supposed to be a peper hinge which goes through the concertina tunnels to hold each folio in place.  I just happened to be in the New York Garment District, and saw the perfect size "bones" to use instead.  Here is a photo showing the bone passing through 3 concertina tunnels and fixing the folio.  Each folio makes 4 pages in the book.

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January 23, 2010

Another Bookbinding Adventure

I use watercolor journals for my daily sketchbooks/visual journals and for the last 18 months I used books I made with commercial bookcloth on the covers.  This year, while experimenting with corn dextrin resist, I created pieces of fabric that I thought would make fun book covers for my art journals and remembered a blog entry about "paper-backing fabric as book cloth" by Roz Stendahl.  I made 4 different pieces of cloth to try and decided to make a completely experimental journal - one that I wouldn't grieve over if it didn't meet my expectations.

I used Fabriano Artitico to make my watercolor journals with 140 lb soft press paper that was grain long - and could use full sheets to make books that were approximately 5.5" X 7.5".  I love this size because it fits comfortably into a small leather backpack, is portrait format, and  and the pages are just big enough for my drawings.  However, last year Fabriano Artistico paper was changed to grain short and I could no longer make that size book from 1 1/2 sheets and with 2 full sheets, there was considerable waste.  So this experimental book was redesigned to be 7.5" wide and 7.3" high.  I never worked in a square format, so this was a perfect time to try it.

I followed Roz's instructions precisely (I thought), but was unable to glue (PVA) the fabric to the Thai mulberry paper without bubbles.  I allowed it to dry and then carefully peeled it off and then tried option #2.  In her blog entry Roz describes book cloth made by someone in her classes using Stitch Witchery as the fusible.  I used Wonder Under (another polyamide) in machine applique since it was marketed in 1986 - and remembered a scientific study done by Drs. Evenson and Crews, of the International Quilt Study Center, at the University of Nebraska - Lincoln, in which they studied "selected quilting products containing adhesives" (Quilters Newsletter, March 2004). Stitch Witchery and Wonder Under were comparable in their lightfastness tests and artifical aging experiments - both were proved acceptable for quilts intended as heirlooms to last less than 100 years.  At 100 years of artificial aging, there was slight yellowing.  Since I have no guarantee that my family won't put my sketchbooks in terminal storage considerably before 100 years, I considered this an acceptable risk! 

Here are photos and a journal page celebrating my new, beloved, watercolor journal.  The fabric was made with green and blue procion MX dyes and corn dextrin resist to make the squiggly lines.  It was then ironed onto the paper using Wonder Under and handled just like book cloth to make my journal cover.  I'm in love!! 

Book Front:

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Book Back:

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Standing Book - the dark green is the metallic end paper

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My Happy, Happy Journal Page:

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December 30, 2009

Christmas Creativity 2009

I always sew ornaments and presents for Christmas - but actually made fewer things than last year.  How could I be busier in retirement than when working?  Not pictured here is Annabelle's cotton velveteen quilt, which is now a family tradition - one for each grandchild on their 2nd Christmas.  My blog name, Paper and Threads, reminds me that textiles are an important part of my life and I try to periodically post the other half of ME!

A Mixed-Media Ornament for my Children's Christmas trees:  Created with paper, fabric, and fabric paints.

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Giraffes for my 4 grandsons:  I dye painted unbleached muslin to make the giraffe skin and then made the ornaments.

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Peacocks for my two grand daughters (and of course me!):  I knew Sydney would love the Swarovski crystals on each tail feather! 

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Zach's Stocking:  Each new grandchild needs a stocking for Grandma to fill for Christmas Eve.

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Zach's Gift Bag - for all of the bigger gifts from Grandma and Grandpa.  We don't wrap presents at all any more.  Over the last 15 years I made gift bags for veryone in the entire family.  The antlers, ear, and tail are all 3-D, not patchwork. 

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September 28, 2009

Paper and Threads Representations of a New York City Subway Mosaic

I was invited to applique a square for the Empire Quilt Guild 2011 Raffle Quilt.  All of the eighteen 11 inch squares are based on New York City subway mosaics and I was thrilled to be assigned the Chambers Street IRT mosaic of Kings College.  We are a Columbia University family and Kings College was the original college which became Columbia University after the Revolution.

I was gvien an applique pattern that was drafted from a photo in a NYC subway book, but decided that I wanted to make my own.  I photographed many of the mosaics which run along both the uptown and downtown platform walls trying to find one that wasn't too damaged by age.

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I drew and painted the mosaic in my daily sketchbook, to try to familiarize myself with the complex design before making a new pattern and selecting fabrics.

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I just completed the applique square - which required more time than any single 11 inch square I ever made - mostly because I decided that I wanted to applique every stone of the building on individually! 

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