Main
Page 2 of 16

November 10, 2016

Transfer Artist Paper (TAP) - on Paper and Fabric

Last Week I was at the International Quilt Festival in Houston - an annual trek I began in 1983.  It was so small then that it was held in the now destroyed Shamrock Hilton Hotel.  I watched it grow until now it takes up 3 floors of the HUGE George Brown Convention Center.  Tuesday I was preoccupied by the election and yesterday I was in shock and unable to think clearly.  So my first blog post of the week is several days overdue.

I took a 3 hour workshop on the use of TAP and wanted to share what I learned.  Here is my testing of the transfer of images and brushstrokes from TAP to watercolor paper.

TAPonPaperSIZE.jpg 

The tulips were a transfer of black and white Clip Art that was printed onto TAP with an ink jet printer and then transferred to my sketchbook.  Since the image is a polymer, I painted it with watercolors to see if the image could be painted.  It could,  I then painted a snippet of the TAP with watercolor and transferred it to the page as dirt under the flower stems.  We were told that you can draw-paint-color on the TAP as long as you don't scratch the surface.  The wide black line was a Pigma brush pen line I transferred from a snippet of TAP, and the single tulip on the right was an image drawn on another snippet of TAP with Tombow brush markers and transferred. 

I then transferred clip art images to fabric.   

TAPonFabricSIZE.jpg 

The yellow rectangle is velvet, the upper green rectangle is cotton, and the bottom triangle is silk.  They were all fused to a white fabric square with Wonder Under before transferring the images to the fabric square.  Each of the fabrics accepted the images well.  The "dot doodles" were made with Tombow marker directly on the Tap and then transferred.

Images are printed on the polymer side of the TAP with an ink-jet printer or created right on the TAP, and then placed face down on the fabric or paper.  They are then covered with Parchment paper and ironed for 10 seconds with a hot dry iron.  The images are permanent - and so is the color - so there are many uses for this technique - and it is lots of fun to play with it! 

Next:  Using Kraft-Tex, a combination fabric-paper with any mixed media technique.

April 15, 2016

Abstract Painting and Surface Design

When I restarted drawing, and learning about watercolors, I was most interested in documenting my life by drawing and painting in sketchbooks.  I've now filled over 100 since 2005 and I love how much I remember about events when I browse through them.  This semester I'm taking an abstract painting class using acrylics, at Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) and was attracted to the course just to shake up my painting - not to switch my focus or medium.

Our first painting was "non-objective" meaning that it was not based on anything in reality. 

http://www.paperandthreads.com/2016/03/my_fiirst_abstract_and_acrylic.php 

The second painting was "objective" meaning that the artist begins with some images from his/her environment and then proceeds to abstract the image.   I like grids and quickly sketched a media wall in front of me as I sat reading. 

LibraryWallSIZE.jpg 

My first painting in the course was in cool colors and I wanted to make this one in hot colors - and I added layers to the 16 x 20" canvas panel over 3 weeks.  This is my finished painting.

IMG_20160415_125411404SIZE.jpg 

 

After I completed this painting I quickly painted some of the things in our class studio - a stool, a high chair, an easel, a ceiling exhaust fan, and a wood stand that holds our paints, palettes etc.  Many of my classmates used the studio as their inspiration and I decided to try it as well.  I painted multiple layers on a 9 X 12" piece of watercolor paper, and this is the result. 

StudioSIZE.jpg 

 

I dye fabric for a variety of projects, including bookcloth for my handmade watercolor sketchbooks.  Most of the fabric designs are abstract, and it took me weeks to realize this similarity to my painting class.  This is my newest watercolor sketchbook - made with a piece of fabric that was tightly rolled and tied in a knot before soaking it in an equal mixture of red and black dye stocks.  The design and colors were a complete, and wonderful surprise. 

IMG_20160415_122947959SIZE.jpg 

I designed pen pockets for my sketchbooks this year and distribute Sewing Instructions if requested on my blog.  I have enough dyed fabric that I can make pen pockets to blend with the covers, and I'm able to use a similar color pocket with the new sketchbook. 

This is the new sketchbook and pocket - and below this photo are others that I made for prior books. 

IMG_20160415_123142998SIZE.jpg 

IMG_20160415_122309700SIZE.jpg 

IMG_20160415_122405084SIZE.jpg 

Please leave a request for the pattern PDF on my blog. 

January 30, 2016

Making Pen Pockets for SketchBooks

Pen Pockets for Sketchbooks:  I decided that I wanted a pocket to keep on my Daily Sketchbooks and designed this pattern last summer.  It fits around a book cover that measures 7 1/2-9 inches in height and  has a Velcro closure.  The pocket easily carries 5 drawing tools.  The Velcro tabs can even be wrapped around the whole book if you want to keep it closed when packing it in purses, travel bags etc.  The tabs can be seen on the Back cover of the Blue Purple Sketchbook.

 

CompositeSIZE.jpg 

Pen Pocket for Travel Sketchbook:  I took this recycled book, that I made a watercolor paper page block for, and added the pen, eraser, and 3 pens before we went to Spain last Fall.  The pocket fits around the front cover, so you can easily grab whatever you would like and I frequently sketched standing up as I followed our Walking Tour Guides. 

IMG_20150930_144847846SIZE.jpg 

I make hand-dyed fabric and selected coordinating pieces for each sketchbook, but my friends each used my PDF tutorial and made one with a single piece of cotton fabric.  It only take 1/2 yd of fabric. 

Tutorial for Making Pen Pocket:  I created a 4 page PDF Tutorial for making this pocket, and would be delighted to share it by email.  Leave a comment on this blog post and I will get your comment, with your request in an email.  I'll then send it to you as soon as I can as an email attachment. 

 

 

  

January 12, 2016

I Love to Make Books!

Each year I make a "Remains of the Day" book - instructions by Mary Ann Moss - to keep photos and ephemera of my "Art Adventures" with friends.  I just finished the pages in my 2015 book and made a new book for 2016.  I love making these from my many dyed fabrics, and I refer to them regularly to remember the many gallery and museum visits we make during the year.  I have 5 completed books which were begun shortly after I retired.

This is my now complete 2015 book: 

ROD5FinalSIZE.jpg 

 

Here is a sample page spread, with a photo of Benedicte, Pat, and Me - along with photos from a day visiting galleries in Chelsea.  Some pages have pockets to hold things, other have lift up flaps - anything goes!

ROD5PageSIZE.jpg 

 

These are photos of my new Remains of the Day book for 2016:

ROD6DoneSIZE.jpg 

ROD6OpenSIZE.jpg 

 

Lastly, I made a new watercolor sketchbook with dyed fabric bookcloth and a pocket for the sketchbook to hold my pencils, pens, and eraser as I walk around sketching.   

Sketchbook55SIZE.jpg 

January 8, 2016

Art Goals for 2016

AlexGoalsSIZE.jpg 

My main goal is to develop better drawing and painting skills on paper and with dye-painting and surface design on fabric.  At the beginning of each year, I like to define new projects which will help me progress and then remain open to new opportunities.

 

1.  Take Classes:

Studying Under the Masters 3:  I really enjoy this online class and registered for it during 2015, even though I was saving the content for Winter 2016.   In the weekly videos I learn more about specific artists I know and meet artists I don't know.  And then I stretch my painting skills by copying a painting of the Master and subsequently using those techniques in an original painting!  Since I convert my copies of masterworks from oil to watercolor for each artist studied, I also experiment and learn an enormous amount in the process.  This is the last time this class series will be offered by Jeanne Oliver and the artists for this series include Horace Pippin, Joan Miro, Marie Laurencin, John Singer Sargent, Gustav Klimt, and Alisa Burke.

Sketchbook Skool Semester 5:  I think Danny and Koosje have created a wonderful model for art education and a committed community of artists, new and old.  I'm already registered for Semester 5 which is called "Expressing."  And here's hoping there is a 6th Semester in 2016!

Craftsy:  I just signed up for "Sketching the City in Pen, Ink, and Watercolor" by Shari Blaukopf.    

Battery Park City Conservancy "Still Lifes and Figure Drawing" with Marla Lipkin a new 9 session class being offered this year locally in NYC from Feb. through March (9 sessions).  

Fashion Institute of Technology  (FIT):  Registration for Spring isn't until the end of January, but I intend to continue taking classes there as long as their Senior Learner program is in existence. 

 

2.  Maintain a Community of Artist Friends: 

It is impossible to attend all of the art activities scheduled in New York City, so my goal is to attend a minimum of one activity/week - Meetup, Urban Sketchers, Battery Park City (May-Oct), Society of Illustrators, and to add other museum and gallery visits with my friends into those days.  I will also continue to post new entries to my blog twice each week to continue my interaction with and inspiration from artists online.   

 

3.  Bookbinding:

Continue to make my own sketchbooks - for daily drawings and for travel.

Create a tutorial for my pencil-pen pocket for sketchbooks.

Create another batch of paste paper for my stash.

 

4.  Special Project: I also like to have one separate project each year.  Several winters ago I sketched/elephants for a whole month using every medium I had.  Another year I studied different methods for making books and made a different type of book each month for 8 months.   This year I am trying to figure out how I can use some of the figure drawings I've accumulated during the last 5 years and transform them into an artist book.  I already transferred images to fabric using a different method for each Quilt Journal Page (8.5 X 11") I created.  Last year I made a small book of the Figures I drew in the Toulouse-Lautrec Café Society sessions at MoMA. 

Here are the first 6 of the Quilt Journal Pages I made in 2012 using hand-dyed fabrics.  I transferred drawings I made of a pregnant model at figure drawing in order to create this Mother and Child series in fabric. 

P1120104size.jpg 

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16