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March 13, 2019

Experimental Screen Printing - Project 3

These are the designs for my next two silk screens at my Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) Experimental Screen Printing class.  For Project 3, we needed to prepare designs for two screens, one with a design/drawing and the other with only typography.  When the screens are printed, the images will need to be accurately placed (registered), so the designs are printed perfectly together.  This image is a composite:  I layered my two designs, each taped to a piece of vellum, clipped them together, and then took the photo as a reference. 

One layer has my figure and the 3 black stripes.  The other layer has my calligraphy printed on acetate, cut into pieces, and taped to the vellum with clear tape.  I just wanted to see the superimposed images before going to class tonight to make the actual silk screens.

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The image on the right is the original figure, created last year as a collage.  I sketched a fashion model and then cut out black and gray paper to collage on my drawing from that fashion illustration class.  This weekend I traced the collage, made patterns for the pieces, and cut the parts out of black paper and a sheet of text from a word processor that was printed on acetate for the blouse. 

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It will take most of my 4 hour class tonight to learn how to register my two designs, and then register them, coat my screens with photoemulsion liquid, dry them for 30 minutes, transfer my designs to the screens in the exposure unit, wash them thoroughly, dry them for 20 minutes, and then tape the screens for printing.  I wrote this just so I can remember!!

My classmates, who are taking the course for credit, need to turn in 3 registered prints in 2 weeks. 

  

March 8, 2019

Experimental Screen Printing 2nd Project

We made two photo emulsion screens for our second project, and then printed both, with different color inks, on the same fabric. 

Design for Screen 1:  black cutouts mounted on vellum with clear tape.

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Design for screen 2:  Various objects, either black or painted black with acrylic paint and a brayer, mounted on acetate with clear tape..

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I don't understand the photo emulsion liquid or the huge camera we used to create our screens, but the only open mesh on the screen was where the black objects were placed. 

Fabric Print 1 on white fabric:  This was the first print - using pale pink, then medium pink, then purple ink.

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Fabric Print 2 on white fabric:  This was the second print, using pale yellow, darker yellow (off set), and two shades of green ink.

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I'm learning lots, and have no idea what I will ever do with the fabric prints, but that is OK.  A stimulated mind at my age is wonderful! 

February 15, 2019

Experimental Screen Printing Class

I am taking an Experimental Screen Painting Class at Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) this semester, and hopefully will gain an understanding of the many methods for screen printing.  I have previously done 2 types of screen prints, and those two prints are at the end of this blog post. 

We made a 4 Color Reduction Print over the first two weeks.  I had no idea what they even meant 2 weeks ago!  Read here for method:  The white shapes on my screen print are the color of the fabric, and I brushed screen filler over every place that you see white to "protect it", and then pulled a print with light blue pigment.  The light blue color is #1.  Going forward, I brushed on "screen filler" to delineate the areas that I wanted to remain light blue, and then pulled a print with darker blue.  This process, i.e. screen filler to delineate areas you want to save, and then pulling a print with darker colors (#3 dark purplish blue and then #4 black). It made my brain hurt trying to figure out the process.  Before adding the black pigment, every part of my screen except for the black areas at the bottom of the screen were brushed with screen filler to maintain the printing I wanted to save.  To pull a print, pudding-like pigments are put along the top edge of the screen and a squeegee is used to pull the paint down over the screen in one slow, consistent movement.

My Print on Fabric: 

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My only other experiences with screen printing were one day workshops printing on fabric with fabric paints.

One color Screen print with mask - a Christmas Tree Decoration:

In the first photo, I made multiple prints of the green tree on a big piece of red fabric using a contact paper "mask "over the screen (with the green sections cut out), only allowing me to print the areas that are green as the print was pulled.  The gold color is machine quilting with metallic gold thread.  

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Thermofax Screen Print with several colors of thickened Procion MX Dye - A Quilt Journal Page:

I don't understand how thermofax screens are made, but essentially a stencil is burned into a screen using a Thermofax photocopying machine and special paper.  I brought black and white ink jet prints to the workshop and the screens were made for me during the workshop.  They are more like stencils with multiple areas on the screen that let paint through. On this 8.5 X 11" quilt journal page, I used several different screens, and colors of thickened dyes for this tiny art quilt.

 

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 Stay Tuned:  Next we are making photoemulsion screens and it is all still a mystery to me.