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April 27, 2013

Gelli Prints, Figure Drawings, and Experimentation

Last week I met with my artist friends and made more gelli prints.  As mentioned before, I don't love acrylic paint, so I tried cheap tube watercolors for some of the prints.  I already posted one watercolor gelli print with daffodils painted over it with WN gouache.  Today I wanted to experiment with different types of pens over both watercolor and acrylic gelli prints.

This is a print made with watercolor.  I resized my graphite drawing from "Live Figure Drawing" at the Society of Illustrators, printed it out on copy paper, and then transferred the image to my gelli print with carbon paper.  Finally, I used a dip pen with a Speedball 5B nib to "draw" the figure on the print.  The ink did not disturb the watercolor ar all and drawing was very easy. 

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Teri recommended Sharpie Paint, Souffle, or Glaze pens for drawing over acrylic.  Since I wanted only a black pen, I tried both the Sharpie oil-based and water-based Paint Pens over two acrylic gelli prints.  I transferred my earlier drawings using the method outlined above. 

The first figure was drawn with the oil-based pen and the second with the water-based pen.  Both were easy to draw and the pen seemed completely unaffected by drawing over acrylic paint.  Can you tell that I ruined many previous pens (in my ignorance) by trying to draw or write over acrylic paint?

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I'm not sure where this series is going, but it might be fun to collage some of these types of prints in an accordion book.

February 24, 2012

MoMA Print Studio Withdrawal

I am leaving tomorrow for vacation and will miss the next to the last week of the Print Studio! 

The Museum of Modern Art in New York City has a 6 week Print Studio program to celebrate two new MoMA print exhibits.  There is a work space in the Education Building and the public in invited to come from 12-4PM, every day except Tuesday, to get inspired and create art.  There are 35 shelves of amazing books to use for inspiration - called the Reanimation Library because these illustrated books were orphaned and destined for destruction.  And there is a color copier, scanners, and computers with photoediting software.

I already posted collage pamphlets that I made in the first 2 sessions - and today wanted to post the covers of all 7 collage books that I made to date in 7 sessions.  Each book is 5 3/4 X 7" and has a total of 8 pages - 2 folios stitched together with a 3 hole pamphlet stitch.

Working in the Print Studio is very inspiring and I am able to work very spontaneously and freely using a technique which is relatively new to me - collage.  My idea for a theme develops quickly as I pull a few books and start to examine the illustrations.  I then quickly select more images which support the theme and/or add visual interest to the pages.   My time is spent tearing and gluing paper, stamping, and adding watercolor pencil highlights.   These books are not amazing, but I loved making them. 

Number 1 - Inheritance of Genetic Characteristics.  This clearly originated in my science/medicine background.

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Number 2: Images and Colors of Venice.  This Spring is our 3rd visit to Venice.

 

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Volume 3:  Faces

 

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Volume 4:  London - a City I know well.  A page from this book was on the MoMA website yesterday!

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Volume 5:  Figure Drawing - another one of my passions

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Volume 6: Children

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Volume 7:  Blood Cells 

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February 7, 2012

MoMA Print Studio and Another Collage Book

I spent the afternoon at the MoMA Print Studio again today,  

When I arrived, I selected six books from the Reanimation Library, and made some color copies of interesting photos and illustrations.  At that moment I had no specific creative ideas, except to make another small pamphlet book.  While I was looking at my copies, a paper mask ink drawing from Joseph Leeming's book, Fun With Paper, made me think of Venice - and I was inspired to make a book using colors and images that remind me of our visits.

The books I pulled,  making an average of 3 copies per book, were:  Hornung's Handbook of Designs and DevicesTalk With Your Hands, Interior Design, Stage Make-up, The Printed Picture, and Fun With Paper.  The images that I used from last time were from the book The Story of Writing.  It amazes me that such random and quickly chosen illustrations/photos can inspire creative ideas on such a different topic.

I had enough random images to use when I combined these copies and I happily tore paper and glued it in place for the next two hours.  The only new image I copied while working was the photo of Venice on the last page and that came from a book entitled Around the World in 2,000 Pictures.  

I used ink, stamps and watercolor pencils over the images after everything was glued in place and stitched the two folios together using linen thread and a pamphlet stitch.

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January 31, 2012

An Afternoon at the MoMA Print Studio

The Museum of Modern Art, in conjunction with two upcoming exhibits  (Print/Out and Printin'), set up a Print Studio in the Education Building.  I spent the afternoon there yesterday and made a small collage book.

The "heart of the Print Studio" is a collection of books known as the Reanimation Library.  It is fascinating and well worth reading about the development of the collection and its permanent home in Brooklyn.  It was developed as a resource for all artists, regardless of their medium. 

When I arrived, I met my friend Judy and had a little tour of the Print Studio.  Here is an overhead photo of the space, with the Reanimation Library on the back wall, copiers, scanners, and computers in the back corner, and work tables for visitors supplied with a variety of art tools and paper.

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I don't have much experience with collage and wanted to make one during the afternoon.  One of the staff said, "Why don't you make a book?  We haven't had anyone do that yet."  I browsed books on the shelves and pulled 6 that had interesting illustrations and photos, and was immediately drawn to one called The Story of Writing.  I love text mixed with images and made some copies of great alphabets from the book.  I then made a few copies from a Science text called Pathways in Science:  The Next Generation and settled down to "play."

I folded 2 folios and added images that appealed to me for the front cover.  I really intended to make this a book about text and writing.  Pages 2 and 3 were from the frontpiece of the science book - a wonderful bookplate for assigning the book to students and the title page with the stamp for the Reanimation Library on the title page.  I was still interested in pursuing the theme of language and writing - and the next thing I knew, I was making a book about human reproduction and the inheritence of genetic traits.  I was very much in the zone and channeling in a unique way.  Fascinating what our brains do if left to wander!

At the very end of my "art play," I opened the 3rd book I brought from the shelves, The Atlas of Human Anatomy, and copied a pregnant uterus for one final collage.  At the end I sketched a human figure and cell, some genetic symbols, and added watercolor pencil and stamps.    

Here are the pages of my finished pamphlet stitched booklet. 

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January 9, 2012

Self-Portrait Class with Jane Davies

I wanted to take an online class in January, when I spend more time at home and more time inside.  Since I am still working through Carla Sonheims 100 Faces project, and I'd love to be more comfortable with Mixed Media/Collage, I signed up for Jane Davies Self-Portrait class.

Today I finished four 9X12 journal pages (90 lb watercolor paper in a Strathmore Visual Journal).  The basis of each were grayscale enlarged photos of me - taken randomly with hair up and hair down.  The goal for this week was to start us working with images of our faces, loosely, in ways that force us to abstract some of the lines and  experiment with paint, ink, color, and collage.

The first 3 images were drawn and then painted +/- collage on top.

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The blue paper used for collage in the above self-portrait was made with soy wax on paper and acrylic paint.

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The 4th image was traced on artist tissue paper and then collaged over a painted/collaged background.

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Looking forward to our week 2 lesson tomorrow! 

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